At the sound of me, men may ...
[5179] At the sound of me, men may ... - At the sound of me, men may dream, Or stamp their feet. At the sound of me, women may laugh, Or sometimes weep. What am I? - #brainteasers #riddles - Correct Answers: 18 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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At the sound of me, men may ...

At the sound of me, men may dream, Or stamp their feet. At the sound of me, women may laugh, Or sometimes weep. What am I?
Correct answers: 18
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #riddles
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The hearing aid

Seems an elderly gentleman had serious hearing problems for a number of years. He went to the doctor and the doctor was able to have him fitted for a set of hearing aids that allowed the gentleman to hear 100%. The elderly gentleman went back in a month to the doctor and the doctor said, "your hearing is perfect. Your family must be really pleased that you can hear again."

To which the gentleman said, "Oh, I haven't told my family yet. I just sit around and listen to the conversations. I've changed my will three times!"

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Walter Bradford Cannon

Born 19 Oct 1871; died 1 Oct 1945 at age 73. American physiologist and neurologist who was the first to use X-rays in physiological studies. These led to his publication of The Mechanical Factors of Digestion (1911). He investigated hemorrhagic and traumatic shock during WW I. He devised the term homeostasis (1930) for how the body maintains its temperature. He worked on methods of blood storage and discovered sympathin (1931), an adrenaline-like substance that is liberated at the tips of certain nerve cells. He died from leukemia - probably a legacy from his early work with X rays. He was nominated for a Nobel Prize in 1920 for his work on digestion, but his claim was ruled out as "too old." In 1934, 1935, and 1936 he was adjudged “prizeworthy” by the appropriate Nobel jurors but was not given a prize.
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