CINEMANIA: Guess the movie title
[3817] CINEMANIA: Guess the movie title - See negative of movie scene and guess the title. Length of words in solution: 3,6,2,3,5,4 - #brainteasers #movie #film #cinemania - Correct Answers: 14 - The first user who solved this task is On On Lunarbasil
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CINEMANIA: Guess the movie title

See negative of movie scene and guess the title. Length of words in solution: 3,6,2,3,5,4
Correct answers: 14
The first user who solved this task is On On Lunarbasil.
#brainteasers #movie #film #cinemania
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Restaurant

An elderly couple had dinner at another couple's house, and after eating,the wives left the table and went into the kitchen. The two gentlemen were talking, and one said, 'Last night we went out to a new restaurant and it was really great. I would recommend it very highly.'
The other man said, 'What is the name of the restaurant?'
The first man thought and thought and finally said, 'What is the name of that flower you give to someone you love? You know... The one that's red and has thorns.'
'Do you mean a rose?'
'Yes, that's the one,' replied the man. He then turned towards the kitchen and yelled, 'Rose, what's the name of that restaurant we went to last night?

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Microfilm camera

In 1931, a microfilm camera was patented by New York City banker, George L. McCarthy (U.S. No. 1,806,763). He developed the first practical commercial microfilm use in the 1920's and was issued a patent in 1925 for his Checkograph machine, designed to make permanent film copies of all bank records to deter fraud. That device used motion picture film and a conveyor belt to photograph checks before they were returned to bank customers. In 1928 Eastman Kodak bought his invention and began to market it with McCarthy as president of Kodak's Recordak Division. With a perfected 35mm microfilm camera, Recordak in 1935 expanded and began filming and publishing the New York Times on microfilm.«
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