Find a famous person
[3394] Find a famous person - Find the first and the last name of a famous person. Text may go in all 8 directions. Length of words in solution: 4,5. - #brainteasers #wordpuzzles - Correct Answers: 19 - The first user who solved this task is Linda Tate Young
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Find a famous person

Find the first and the last name of a famous person. Text may go in all 8 directions. Length of words in solution: 4,5.
Correct answers: 19
The first user who solved this task is Linda Tate Young.
#brainteasers #wordpuzzles
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A man is walking from the lake...

A man is walking from the lake carrying two fish in a bucket. He is approached by the game warden who asks him for his fishing license.
The fisherman says to the warden, "I did not catch these fish, they are my pets. Every day I come down to the water and whistle and these fish jump out and I take them around to see the sights only to return them at the end of the day."
The warden, not believing him, reminds him that it is illegal to fish without a license. The fisherman turns to the warden and says, "If you don?t believe me then watch," as he throws the fish back into the water.
The warden says, "Now whistle to your fish and show me how they jump out the water."
The fisherman turns to the warden and says, "What fish?"
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Patent pills

In 1796, the first U.S. patent for a pill of any kind was issued to Samuel Lee, Jr., of Connecticut, for a "Composition of bilious pills" which he renewed on 24 May 1810 and marketed as "Lee's Windham Pills." These pills were the subject of patents and renewals by both him and his son Samuel H.P. Lee (1772-1863), and were highly popular for a long period.* "Lee's New-London Bilious Pills" (named after New-London, Connecticut) were patented by his son on 26 Jun 1799 and 8 Feb 1814. An advertisement of 1803 for "Doctor Lee's Patent New-London Bilious Pills" described them as "Interesting to all sea-faring People" and promised to cure a variety of ills, including "foul stomachs, where pukes are indicated."«[Image: part of advertisement for Dr. Lee's New-London Bilious Pills, 1803)
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