Find a famous person
[3579] Find a famous person - Find the first and the last name of a famous person. Text may go in all 8 directions. Length of words in solution: 6,7. - #brainteasers #wordpuzzles - Correct Answers: 19 - The first user who solved this task is Fazil Hashim
10
29
7.07
BRAIN TEASERS
enter your answer and press button OK

Find a famous person

Find the first and the last name of a famous person. Text may go in all 8 directions. Length of words in solution: 6,7.
Correct answers: 19
The first user who solved this task is Fazil Hashim.
#brainteasers #wordpuzzles
Register with your Google or Facebook Account and start collecting points.
Check your ranking on list.

Home yet?

A middle aged woman sought help from her doctor.

"All my husband does is complain that I never want to have sex with him," she said. "And he's right too. I have no desire at all."

The doctor gave her a prescription and told her to return for a visit in two weeks. After the two weeks were up, she bounced smiling into his office.

"Those pills were great Doc, I'm doin' it twice a night now."

"That's wonderful," said the doctor, "What does your husband say now?"

"How should I know?" she replied. "I ain't been home yet."

Jokes of the day - Daily updated jokes. New jokes every day.
Follow Brain Teasers on social networks

Brain Teasers

puzzles, riddles, mathematical problems, mastermind, cinemania...

Antiproton

In 1955, a new atomic subparticle called a negative proton (antiproton) was discovered at U.C. Berkeley. The hunt for antimatter began in earnest in 1932, with the discovery of the positron, a particle with the mass of an electron and a positive charge. However, creating an antiproton would be far more difficult since it needs nearly 2,000 times the energy. In 1955, the most powerful "atom smasher" in the world, the Bevatron built at Berkeley could provide the required energy. Detection was accomplished with a maze of magnets and electronic counters through which only antiprotons could pass. After several hours of bombarding copper with protons accelerated to 6.2 billion electron volts of energy, the scientists counted a total of 60 antiprotons.[Image: The first annihilation star, Faustina, of an antiproton found in film exposed by the Berkeley scientists, 1955]
This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some are essential to help the site properly. Others give us insight into how the site is used and help us to optimize the user experience. See our privacy policy.