Find number abc
[4108] Find number abc - If c9a4a + 22c5c = 4cb9b find number abc. Multiple solutions may exist. - #brainteasers #math - Correct Answers: 52 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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Find number abc

If c9a4a + 22c5c = 4cb9b find number abc. Multiple solutions may exist.
Correct answers: 52
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math
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Rosebuds

The teenage granddaughter comes downstairs for her date with this see-through blouse on and no bra. Her grandmother just has a fit, telling her not to dare go out like that.

The teenager tells her "Loosen up Grams. These are modern times. You gotta let your rosebuds show!" and out she goes.

The next day the teenager comes downstairs, and the grandmother is sitting there with no top on. The teenager wants to die.

She explains to her grandmother that she has friends coming over and that it is just not appropriate.

"Loosen up, sweetie. If you can show off your rosebuds, then I can display my hanging baskets."

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Compound steam engine patent

In 1781, a British patent was taken out for the first compound steam engine by Jonathan Carter Hornblower (No. 1298). His invention was to use two cylinders of unequal size attached to the same beam. Steam acts first in a small high-pressure cylinder, leaving at a lower pressure, but still sufficient to expand further in a larger cylinder. Although he claimed greater efficiency, this was not realised at the low steam pressures of the day. Boulton and Watt claimed infringement on their earlier patent since this engine still used a separate condenser, so Hornblower had to abandon that design at the time. His compound steam engine principle was later revived in 1804 by Arthur Woolf using higher steam pressure with better results.«
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