Find the next number in the ...
[3975] Find the next number in the ... - Find the next number in the sequence 517, 1251343, 181251276427, ... - #brainteasers #math - Correct Answers: 37 - The first user who solved this task is H Tav
BRAIN TEASERS
enter your answer and press button OK

Find the next number in the ...

Find the next number in the sequence 517, 1251343, 181251276427, ...
Correct answers: 37
The first user who solved this task is H Tav.
#brainteasers #math
Register with your Google Account and start collecting points.
Check your ranking on list.

Coffin

A man was walking home alone late one night when he hears a BUMP... BUMP... BUMP... behind him.

Walking faster he looks back, and makes out the image of an upright coffin banging its way down the middle of the street towards him.

BUMP... BUMP... BUMP...

Terrified, the man begins to run towards his home, the coffin bouncing quickly behind him ...

faster... faster... BUMP... BUMP... BUMP...

He runs up to his door, fumbles with his keys, opens the door, rushes in, slams and locks the door behind him.

However, the coffin crashes through his door, with the lid of the coffin clapping...

clappity-BUMP... clappity-BUMP... clappity-BUMP... on the heels of the terrified man.

Rushing upstairs to the bathroom, the man locks himself in.

His heart is pounding; his head is reeling; his breath is coming in sobbing gasps.

With a loud CRASH the coffin starts breaking down the door. Bumping and clapping towards him.

The man SCREAMS and reaches for something heavy, anything .. his hand comes to rest on a large bottle of Robitussin.

Desperate, he throws the cough syrup as hard as he can at the apparition... and...

the coffin stops!

Jokes of the day - Daily updated jokes. New jokes every day.
Follow Brain Teasers on social networks

Brain Teasers

puzzles, riddles, mathematical problems, mastermind, cinemania...

Wolfgang Paul

Died 6 Dec 1993 at age 80 (born 10 Aug 1913).German physicist who developed the Paul trap, an electromagnetic device that captures ions and holds them long enough for study and precise measurement of their properties. During the 1950s he developed the so-called Paul trap as a means of confining and studying electrons. The device consists of three electrodes - two end caps and an encircling ring. The ring is connected to an oscillating potential. The direction of the electric field alternates; for half the time the electron is pushed from the caps to the ring and for the other half it is pulled from the ring and pushed towards the caps. For his work he shared the 1989 Nobel Prize for Physics with Hans Georg Dehmelt and Norman F. Ramsey.
This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some are essential to help the site properly. Others give us insight into how the site is used and help us to optimize the user experience. See our privacy policy.