Find the right combination
[6031] Find the right combination - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 24 - The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T
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Find the right combination

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 24
The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T.
#brainteasers #mastermind
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Operating Room

Two little kids are in a hospital, lying on stretchers next to each other outside the operating room.
The first kid leans over and asks, "What are you in here for?"
The second kid says, "I'm in here to get my tonsils out and I'm a little nervous."
The first kid says, "You've got nothing to worry about. I had that done when I was four. They put you to sleep, and when you wake up they give you lots of Jell-O and ice cream. It's a breeze."
The second kid then asks, "What are you here for?"
The first kid says, "A circumcision."
"Whoa!" the second kid replies. "Good luck, buddy. I had that done when I was born. Couldn't walk for a year."  

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Armstrong demonstration of FM radio to FCC

In 1936, Edwin H. Armstrong demonstrated his invention of FM radio in Washington D.C. to a fact-finding investigation conducted by the Federal Communications Commission into the future of radio and television. His revolutionary method modulated the frequency of a broadcast radio wave to carry the audio signal (FM), instead of the existing use of amplitude modulation (AM). Armstrong's new system utilized a higher frequency band than was used by existing commercial radio transmitters. It eliminated all static and outside interference. Several hundred representatives of the radio industry were present. Armstrong presented the differences between the old and new methods with a series of sound-film recordings of the same program under the different conditions. FM was clear of the hissing, buzzing and crackling static noises of AM.«
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