I look flat, but I am deep, ...
[5829] I look flat, but I am deep, ... - I look flat, but I am deep, Hidden realms I shelter. Lives I take, but food I offer. At times I am beautiful. I can be calm, angry and turbulent. I have no heart, but offer pleasure as well as death. No man can own me, yet I encompass what all men must have. What am I? - #brainteasers #riddles - Correct Answers: 61 - The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T
BRAIN TEASERS
enter your answer and press button OK

I look flat, but I am deep, ...

I look flat, but I am deep, Hidden realms I shelter. Lives I take, but food I offer. At times I am beautiful. I can be calm, angry and turbulent. I have no heart, but offer pleasure as well as death. No man can own me, yet I encompass what all men must have. What am I?
Correct answers: 61
The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T.
#brainteasers #riddles
Register with your Google Account and start collecting points.
Check your ranking on list.

Little Emily was complaining t...

Little Emily was complaining to her mother that her stomach hurt. Her mother replied, “That’s because it's empty. Maybe you should try putting something in it." The next day, the pastor was over at Emily's family's house for lunch. He mentioned having his head hurt, to which Emily immediately replied, "That's because it's empty. Maybe you should try putting something in it."
Jokes of the day - Daily updated jokes. New jokes every day.
Follow Brain Teasers on social networks

Brain Teasers

puzzles, riddles, mathematical problems, mastermind, cinemania...

First milk quality law in U.S.

In 1856, the first milk quality law in the U.S. was signed by the Governor of Massachusetts prohibiting adulteration of milk. An individual had to take a complaint to court. With no official enforcement, the law was ineffective against “swill milk,” the poor, thin output of cows kept in sicky conditions and fed on distillery refuse. Unsafe milk was a public health hazard, sometimes deadly to infants. So the state passed a law on (6 Apr 1859) authorizing cities to appoint their own official Inspector of Milk. He was empowered to enter the premises of handlers of milk, and to take specimens for analysis, the results of which could be evidence used for prosecution. The law set ten dollar fines for selling swill milk. Boston was the first city in the U.S. to appoint a full-time Inspector of Milk, on 10 Aug 1859.«[Image: A New York City inspector at a grocery testing milk with a lactometer, c.1887.]
This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some are essential to help the site properly. Others give us insight into how the site is used and help us to optimize the user experience. See our privacy policy.