MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C
[4873] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (11, 13, 15, 21, 23, 25, 51, 53, 55) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 11 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (11, 13, 15, 21, 23, 25, 51, 53, 55) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C.
Correct answers: 11
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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Philip was enjoying the second...

Philip was enjoying the second week of a two-week vacation the same way he had enjoyed the first week: by doing as little as possible.
He ignored his wife Paula's not-so-subtle hints about completing certain jobs around the house, but Philip didn't realize how much this bothered her until the clothes dryer refused to work, the iron shorted and the sewing machine motor burned out in the middle of a seam. The final straw came when she plugged in the vacuum cleaner and nothing happened.
Paula looked so stricken that he had to offer some consolation.
"That's OK, darling," Philip said. "You still have me."
Paula looked up at him with tears in her eyes. "Yes, Philip," she wailed, "but you don't work either."
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Sir Francis Bacon

Born 22 Jan 1561; died 9 Apr 1626 at age 65. English philosopher remembered for his influence promoting a scientific method. He held that the aim of scientific investigation is practical application of the understanding of nature to improve man's condition. He wrote that scientists should concentrate on certain important kinds of experimentally reproducible situations, (which he called "prerogative instances"). After tabulating such phenomena, the investigator should also aim to make a gradual ascent to more and more comprehensive laws, and will acquire greater and greater certainty as he or she moves up the pyramid of laws. At the same time each law that is reached should lead him to new kinds of experiment, that is, to kinds of experiment over and above those that led to the discovery of the law.
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