MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C
[5550] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (3, 5, 6, 27, 29, 31, 32, 43, 45, 46, 73, 93, 96) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A-B+C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 17 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (3, 5, 6, 27, 29, 31, 32, 43, 45, 46, 73, 93, 96) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A-B+C.
Correct answers: 17
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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A college student in a philosophy class was taking his first examination.
On the paper there was a single line which simply said: "Is this a question?" - Discuss.
After a short time he wrote: "If that is a question, then this is an answer."
The student received an "A" on the exam.
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