MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C
[5550] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (3, 5, 6, 27, 29, 31, 32, 43, 45, 46, 73, 93, 96) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A-B+C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 20 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (3, 5, 6, 27, 29, 31, 32, 43, 45, 46, 73, 93, 96) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A-B+C.
Correct answers: 20
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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Philip was enjoying the second...

Philip was enjoying the second week of a two-week vacation the same way he had enjoyed the first week: by doing as little as possible.
He ignored his wife Paula's not-so-subtle hints about completing certain jobs around the house, but Philip didn't realize how much this bothered her until the clothes dryer refused to work, the iron shorted and the sewing machine motor burned out in the middle of a seam. The final straw came when she plugged in the vacuum cleaner and nothing happened.
Paula looked so stricken that he had to offer some consolation.
"That's OK, darling," Philip said. "You still have me."
Paula looked up at him with tears in her eyes. "Yes, Philip," she wailed, "but you don't work either."
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Camera rocket apparatus

In 1904, a rocket apparatus for taking photographs was patented in the U.S. by Alfred Maul of Dresden, Germany (No. 757,825). He described how, with its timing device, it would automatically take photographs giving bird's-eye views of the ground, with the camera mounted obliquely to the ground during the nearly-vertical upward flight. Maul acknowledged a prior patent for a camera rocket (German No. 64,209 to Ludwig Rohrmann granted 14 Jul 1891) and there were others. However, beginning his practical work in 1901, Maul is known to have actually constructed workable camera rockets, and achieved world-wide fame. He improved his design in U.S. patent 847,198 on 12 Mar 1907. His purpose was observational use in military applications, but was obsoleted by aircraft used in WW I.«
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