MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C
[6026] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (15, 16, 22, 24, 25, 31, 36, 37, 43, 61, 79) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 14 - The first user who solved this task is Nílton Corrêa de Sousa
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (15, 16, 22, 24, 25, 31, 36, 37, 43, 61, 79) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C.
Correct answers: 14
The first user who solved this task is Nílton Corrêa de Sousa.
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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Griffith Brewer

Born 23 Jul 1867; died 1 Mar 1948 at age 80.Edward Griffith Brewer was an English lawyer, balloonist and aviator who was the first Englishman to fly in an airplane (though as a passenger). Brewer was a patent attorney, who had been making aerial ascents since 1891 as a ballonist. In 1908, he met Wilbur Wrightwho was giving flying exhibitions in France. Wilbur took Brewer on a short airplane ride, which prompted Brewer to ask about taking flying instruction some time later. They established a lifetime friendship, and Brewer made many visits to Wright's home in Dayton. Meanwhile, Langley—the director of the Smithsonian Institution—was claiming to have had his own Great Aerodrome capable of flight before the Wrights. Brewer staunchly supported the Wrights by writing to the New York Times, and lecturing to the Royal Society in England. He suggested the 1903 Wright Flyer be exhibited at the Science Museum. in London.«
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