MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C
[6207] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (25, 26, 29, 30, 34, 38, 65, 66, 74, 86) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 6 - The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (25, 26, 29, 30, 34, 38, 65, 66, 74, 86) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C.
Correct answers: 6
The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T.
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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Lawyers On A Flight


An airliner was having engine trouble, and the pilot instructed the cabin crew to have the passengers take their seats and get prepared for an emergency landing.
A few minutes later, the pilot asked the flight attendants if everyone was buckled in and ready.
"All set back here, Captain," came the reply, "except the lawyers are still going around passing out business cards."
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Shopping carts

In 1937, the first shopping carts were introduced at the Humpty Dumpty supermarket in Oklahoma City, invented by the store owner Sylvan Goldman. With the aid of a mechanic, Fred Young, Goldman designed the first shopping cart based on the folding chair. Wheels were placed where the bottoms of the chair legs were. In place of the chair seat, Young and Goldman, stacked two metal baskets on top of each other. This cart could be stored by folding it up like a folding chair. In 1947, Goldman made a big improvement in the design of his shopping cart with carts that could be stored by simply nesting one cart into another by pushing the front of each cart into the folding back of the one in front of it. This basic design is still in use today.
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