MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace...
[2511] MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace... - MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace the question mark with a number? - #brainteasers #math #riddles - Correct Answers: 128 - The first user who solved this task is Roxana zavari
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MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace...

MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace the question mark with a number?
Correct answers: 128
The first user who solved this task is Roxana zavari.
#brainteasers #math #riddles
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There was a farmer who grew wa...

There was a farmer who grew watermelons. He was doing pretty well, but he was disturbed by some local kids who would sneak into his watermelon patch at night and eat his watermelons.
After some careful thought, he came up with a clever idea that he thought would scare the kids away for sure. He made up a sign and posted it in the field. The next night, the kids showed up and they saw the sign which read, "Warning! One of the watermelons in this field has been injected with cyanide."
The kids ran off, made up their own sign and posted it next to the farmer's sign. When the farmer returned, he surveyed the field. He noticed that no watermelons were missing, but the sign next to his read, "Now there are two!"
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Ether anesthetic

In 1846, American dentist, Dr William T.G. Morton (9 Aug 1819 - 15 Jul 1868) made the first public demonstration of the administration of ether anesthetic, which the patient inhaled from a blown glass flask, during an operation performed by Dr. John Collins Warren (1778-1856) at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The patient, Gilbert Abbott, age 20, had a small superficial tumor removed from beneath the left lower jaw. Two weeks before (30 Sep1846), Morton had privately made a painless tooth extraction for a patient. The suggestion to use ether came from the chemist Charles T. Jackson, (1860-1913). After the success of the public demonstration, the use of ether for painless operations spread quickly to other countries.
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