Marking mortal privation, wh...
[3754] Marking mortal privation, wh... - Marking mortal privation, when firmly in place. An enduring summation, inscribed in my face. What am I? - #brainteasers #riddles - Correct Answers: 16 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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Marking mortal privation, wh...

Marking mortal privation, when firmly in place. An enduring summation, inscribed in my face. What am I?
Correct answers: 16
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #riddles
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A woman in Atlantic City was l...

A woman in Atlantic City was losing at the roulette wheel. When she was down to her last 10 dollars, she asked the fellow next to her for a good number. “Why don’t you play your age?” he suggested. The woman agreed, and then put her money on the table.
The next thing the guy with the advice knew, the woman had fainted and fallen to the floor. He rushed right over. “Did she win?” he asked. “No” replied the attendant. “She put 10 dollars on 33 and 46 came in.”
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Oswald Veblen

Born 24 Jun 1880; died 10 Aug 1960 at age 80.American mathematician who made important contributions in early topology, and in projective and differential geometry - work which found applications in atomic physics and the theory of relativity. In 1905, he proved the Jordan curve theorem, which states that every non-self-intersecting loop in the plane divides the plane into an "inside" and an "outside". Although it may seem obvious in its statement, it is a very difficult theorem to prove. During WW II, he was involved in overseeing the work that produced the pioneering ENIAC electronic digital computer. His name is commemorated by the American Mathematical Society's Oswald Veblen Prize. Awarded every five years, it is the most prestigious award in recognition of outstanding research in geometry.«
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