Remove 5 letters from this seq...
[5279] Remove 5 letters from this seq... - Remove 5 letters from this sequence (REMMTMEMBAEREBD) to reveal a familiar English word. - #brainteasers #wordpuzzles - Correct Answers: 25 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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Remove 5 letters from this seq...

Remove 5 letters from this sequence (REMMTMEMBAEREBD) to reveal a familiar English word.
Correct answers: 25
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #wordpuzzles
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A guy gets set up on a blind d...

A guy gets set up on a blind date and he takes her out for dinner to a very expensive restaurant to make a good impression. The waiter approaches the table and asks to take their order.
The lady begins ordering practically everything on the menu, shrimp cocktail, pate, Caesar Salad, lobster, crepes Suzette, with no regard to the price. The guy is getting very upset, as he never thought she would order so much.
She then stops, and looks across at him, and asks, "What do you suggest I wash it down with?"
"Well my dear, how about the Mississippi river?"
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Frank Harold Spedding

Born 22 Oct 1902; died 15 Dec 1984 at age 82.American chemist who, during the 1940s and '50s, developed processes for reducing individual rare-earth elements to the metallic state at low cost, thereby making these substances available to industry at reasonable prices. Earlier, upon the discovery of nuclear fission in 1939, the U.S. government asked leading scientists to join in the development of nuclear energy. In 1942, Iowa State College's Frank H. Spedding, an expert in the chemistry of rare earths, agreed to set up the Ames portion of the Manhattan Project, resulting in an easy and inexpensive procedure to produce high quality uranium. Between 1942 and 1945, almost two million pounds of uranium was processed on campus, in the old Popcorn Laboratory.
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