Remove 7 letters from this seq...
[5411] Remove 7 letters from this seq... - Remove 7 letters from this sequence (ILUNPIIVERSITCCYH) to reveal a familiar English word. - #brainteasers #wordpuzzles - Correct Answers: 33 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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Remove 7 letters from this seq...

Remove 7 letters from this sequence (ILUNPIIVERSITCCYH) to reveal a familiar English word.
Correct answers: 33
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #wordpuzzles
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Goldfish burial

Little eight-year-old Nancy was in the garden filling in a hole when her neighbor peered over the fence. Interested in what the youngster was doing, he asked: "What are you doing there, Nancy?"

"My goldfish died," Nancy sobbed. "And I've just buried him."

The obnoxious neighbor laughed and said condescendingly: "That's a really big hole for a little goldfish, don't you think?"

Nancy patted down the last heap of earth with her shovel and replied: "That's because he's inside your cat."

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Frank Harold Spedding

Born 22 Oct 1902; died 15 Dec 1984 at age 82.American chemist who, during the 1940s and '50s, developed processes for reducing individual rare-earth elements to the metallic state at low cost, thereby making these substances available to industry at reasonable prices. Earlier, upon the discovery of nuclear fission in 1939, the U.S. government asked leading scientists to join in the development of nuclear energy. In 1942, Iowa State College's Frank H. Spedding, an expert in the chemistry of rare earths, agreed to set up the Ames portion of the Manhattan Project, resulting in an easy and inexpensive procedure to produce high quality uranium. Between 1942 and 1945, almost two million pounds of uranium was processed on campus, in the old Popcorn Laboratory.
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