Replace asterisk symbols with ...
[5418] Replace asterisk symbols with ... - Replace asterisk symbols with a letters (*** K*D* ** T** *L*C*) and guess the name of musician band. Length of words in solution: 3,4,2,3,5. - #brainteasers #music - Correct Answers: 17 - The first user who solved this task is Chandu Rajyaguru
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Replace asterisk symbols with ...

Replace asterisk symbols with a letters (*** K*D* ** T** *L*C*) and guess the name of musician band. Length of words in solution: 3,4,2,3,5.
Correct answers: 17
The first user who solved this task is Chandu Rajyaguru.
#brainteasers #music
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How much?

A man meets a woman at a bar and asks her

"Would you have sex with me for 10 million dollars?"

Without skipping a beat she screams

"Yes!"

The man then asks

"What about for $20?"

She looks at him sideways and says

"What do you think I am, a whore?"

The man says

"We've already established that you are, now we're just negotiating."

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John B. Jervis

Born 14 Dec 1795; died 12 Jan 1885 at age 89. John Bloomfield Jervis was an American civil engineer who made outstanding contributions in construction of canals, railroads, and water-supply systems for the expanding United States. Jervis began his career in Rome as an Axeman for an Erie Canal survey party in 1817. By 1823 he was superintendent of a 50-mile section of the Erie Canal. After appointment in 1827 as its Chief Engineer, he won approval of his idea that a railroad be incorporated into the Delaware and Hudson Canal project, at a time there were no railroads in America. Jervis even designed its locomotive, the Stourbridge Lion, the first locomotive to run in America. He designed and built the 41-mile Croton Aqueduct (New York City's water supply for fifty years: 1842-91), and the Boston Aqueduct.
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