Replace the question mark with a number
[2706] Replace the question mark with a number - MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace the question mark with a number? - #brainteasers #math #riddles - Correct Answers: 210 - The first user who solved this task is Roxana zavari
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Replace the question mark with a number

MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace the question mark with a number?
Correct answers: 210
The first user who solved this task is Roxana zavari.
#brainteasers #math #riddles
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Two Jewish businessmen meet in...

Two Jewish businessmen meet in a restaurant for a lunch suggested by one of them.
The first says, "I have a good deal for you. When I was in Florida, I went to the town where the circus stays during the winter. I happened to pick up an elephant. I could let you have it for a thousand dollars."
The other businessman sipped his martini and said, "What are you, crazy? What am I going to do with an elephant? I live in a condo. I barely have room for my furniture. I can't even squeeze in an end table. So I'm going to buy an elephant?"
The first businessman said, "I could let you have three of them for two grand."
"Oh," said the other, "now you're talking!"
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Airplane loop-the-loop

In 1913, the first airplane in the U.S. to perform a loop-the-loop was piloted by Lincoln Beachey over North Isalnd, San Diego, California. At a level of 1,000 feet, he brought his aircraft up with a swoop and a moment later was flying head downward. He completed the loop at a height of 300 feet. Ten days later he performed a triple loop. Beachey was one of the more colorful characters of early aviation. By 1912, he was a stunt pilot of great repute. His daring acts made him well known in aviation circles. In Chicago, he flew along a string of boxcars first rolling one wheel then the other alternatively along the car roofs as the train was rolling down the tracks. He died in 1915, at age 28, from a crash while performing stunts at the Panama-Pacific Exhibition, Cal.
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