Take a look at the picture of ...
[4649] Take a look at the picture of ... - Take a look at the picture of the movie scene and guess the name of the person whose face is not visible. Length of words in solution: 4,5 - #brainteasers #movie #film #cinemania - Correct Answers: 29 - The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle
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Take a look at the picture of ...

Take a look at the picture of the movie scene and guess the name of the person whose face is not visible. Length of words in solution: 4,5
Correct answers: 29
The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle.
#brainteasers #movie #film #cinemania
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Private Grief

A man placed some flowers on the grave of his dearly departed mother and started back toward his car when his attention was diverted to another man kneeling at a grave. The man seemed to be praying with profound intensity and kept repeating, "Why did you have to die? Why did you have to die?"
The first man approached him and said, "Sir, I don't wish to interfere with your private grief, but this demonstration of pain is more than I've ever seen before. For whom do you mourn so deeply? A child? A parent?"
The mourner took a moment to collect himself, then replied, "My wife's first husband."

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Airplane loop-the-loop

In 1913, the first airplane in the U.S. to perform a loop-the-loop was piloted by Lincoln Beachey over North Isalnd, San Diego, California. At a level of 1,000 feet, he brought his aircraft up with a swoop and a moment later was flying head downward. He completed the loop at a height of 300 feet. Ten days later he performed a triple loop. Beachey was one of the more colorful characters of early aviation. By 1912, he was a stunt pilot of great repute. His daring acts made him well known in aviation circles. In Chicago, he flew along a string of boxcars first rolling one wheel then the other alternatively along the car roofs as the train was rolling down the tracks. He died in 1915, at age 28, from a crash while performing stunts at the Panama-Pacific Exhibition, Cal.
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