What a winning combination?
[4136] What a winning combination? - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 18 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
10
28
7.04
BRAIN TEASERS
enter your answer and press button OK

What a winning combination?

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 18
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #mastermind
Register with your Google or Facebook Account and start collecting points.
Check your ranking on list.

They Cheated

Once two star football players had failed a test, and could not play football in the championship game.
So, after much begging from the coach, the teacher finally let the two take the test again.
They took the test, and turned it in.
The coach and the two students watched carefully over the teacher grading the tests. She checked over the first test, then over the second test. Half way through the second test she stopped and put a great big 'F' on both tests.
The coach was furious and demanded an explanation. She said that they had cheated. 'Why?' the coach asked.
The teacher showed him number six. The coach looked at number six on the first test.
The answer read 'I don't know.' The coach said that it did not prove anything.
The teacher handed him the second test. The answer read 'I don't know either.'

Jokes of the day - Daily updated jokes. New jokes every day.
Follow Brain Teasers on social networks

Brain Teasers

puzzles, riddles, mathematical problems, mastermind, cinemania...

Jacques-Salomon Hadamard

Died 17 Oct 1963 at age 97 (born 8 Dec 1865).French mathematician who proved the prime-number theorem (as n approaches infinity, the limit of the ratio of (n) and n/ln n is 1, where (n) is the number of positive prime numbers not greater than n). Conjectured in the 18th century, this theorem was not proved until 1896, when Hadamard and also Charles de la Vallée Poussin, used complex analysis. Hadamard's work includes the theory of integral functions and singularities of functions represented by Taylor series. His work on the partial differential equations of mathematical physics is important. He introduced the concept of a well-posed initial value and boundary value problem. In considering boundary value problems he introduced a generalisation of Green's functions (1932).
This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some are essential to help the site properly. Others give us insight into how the site is used and help us to optimize the user experience. See our privacy policy.