What a winning combination?
[4611] What a winning combination? - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 29 - The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle
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What a winning combination?

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 29
The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle.
#brainteasers #mastermind
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They Cheated

Once two star football players had failed a test, and could not play football in the championship game.
So, after much begging from the coach, the teacher finally let the two take the test again.
They took the test, and turned it in.
The coach and the two students watched carefully over the teacher grading the tests. She checked over the first test, then over the second test. Half way through the second test she stopped and put a great big 'F' on both tests.
The coach was furious and demanded an explanation. She said that they had cheated. 'Why?' the coach asked.
The teacher showed him number six. The coach looked at number six on the first test.
The answer read 'I don't know.' The coach said that it did not prove anything.
The teacher handed him the second test. The answer read 'I don't know either.'

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1,000th pulsar

In 1998, the discovery of the 1,000th pulsar in our galaxy was announced in a press release by the Jodrell Bank Observatory, University of Manchester, using the 64-meter Parkes Radio Telescope in New South Wales, Australia. A “multibeam”receiver was installed on the telescope in early 1997. This allowed the astronomers from England, Australia, United States, and Italy to find pulsars much faster than before. On average, they found a new pulsar in every hour of observing. By this date, the researchers had found more than 200 pulsars and they expected to find another 600 more before the survey ended. The “multibeam”receiver used consists of 13 hexagonally arranged receivers that allow simultaneous observations.
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