What a winning combination?
[4611] What a winning combination? - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 28 - The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle
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What a winning combination?

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 28
The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle.
#brainteasers #mastermind
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John Oliver: Taxation Without Representation

Frankly, I could not f**king believe I was not allowed to vote. Three and a half years Ive lived here! I work hard -- relatively speaking for someone who does this for a living. I pay my taxes. I try to fit in. Ive learnt your rudimentary language. I dont know what more you could reasonably expect me to do. And thats when it hit me. I know why Im so angry. I know what this is -- taxation without representation. Now I get it. Now I see why you got so pissy about it all those years ago. It is annoying. You were right. It is annoying and consider that as close to an apology as you are ever going to get.
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Rotary washing machine

In 1835, a U.S. patent was issued for a rotary washing machine to C. H. Farnham (issued without number, known as 8993X). A hand-turned crank rotated a perforated cylinder within a covered wooden shell. Clothes were put inside the cylinder through a hatch in the shell and a removeable panel in the cylinder. This was not the first patent for a washing machine issued in the U.S. - the earliest patent was granted 3 Mar 1797 to Nathaniel Briggs of New Hampshire for "an improvement in washing clothes."
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