What a winning combination?
[5596] What a winning combination? - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 12 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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What a winning combination?

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 12
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #mastermind
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What a Coincidence

Q: What did the bartender say when a priest, a Boy Scout, and a blonde walked in?

A: "Is this a joke?"

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Georg von Kleist

Died 11 Dec 1748 (born c. 1700).Ewald Georg von Kleist was a German clergyman and physicist who was dean of the Cathedral of Kamin. Kleist experimented to store electric charge efficiently, and independently discovered (1745) the Leyden jar, an early form of thecapacitor, which in a different, miniature form is now an important electronic circuit component.The first Leyden jar was a stoppered glass jar partially filled with water with a wire or nail extending through the cork into the water. While holding the jar in one hand, the jar was charged by placing the end of the wire into contact with a static electricity producer, then removed. When Kleist touched the wire with his other hand, a discharge took place, giving himself a violent shock. The device was more thoroughly investigated by Pieter van Musschenbroek (1746).
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