What a winning combination?
[7751] What a winning combination? - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 2
BRAIN TEASERS
enter your answer and press button OK

What a winning combination?

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 2
#brainteasers #mastermind
Register with your Google Account and start collecting points.
Check your ranking on list.

There’s a light inside of everyone

There’s a light inside of everyone. No matter what, someone is always going to come around and try to dim that light or shut it off. Whatever you do, you hold on to that light and you fight. You fight to not let that person tear you down, you fight for the right to define yourself, to not let anyone else tell you who you are. You gotta keep your head up, because people will always hang around waiting for you to fall, for the light to shut off. Don’t ever let someone fade the light that makes you beautiful. Because in the end, you’re the one who controls how brightly you shine.
Jokes of the day - Daily updated jokes. New jokes every day.
Follow Brain Teasers on social networks

Brain Teasers

puzzles, riddles, mathematical problems, mastermind, cinemania...

Comet spectrum

In 1881, Sir William Huggins made the first photographicspectrumthe first photographic spectrum of a comet (1881 III) and discovered the cyanogen (CN) emission at violet wavelengths. (This fact caused near mass hysteria 29 years later as the Earth passed thru the tail of Halley's Comet and some persons worried about the effect of this for life on Earth.) The first spectroscopic observations of comets were made made by Giovanni Donati (1864) and by Huggins in 1868 when he visually compared the spectrum of comet Winnecke (1868 II) with flame spectra and found that the bands seen in the comet and in the flame, now known as the “carbon”or “Swan Bands”were similar. Spectroscopy soon became the standard technique for studying the light of comets.[Ref: W. Huggins, "Preliminary Note on the Photographic Spectrum of Comet b, 1881," Proceedings of the Royal Society 33 (1881): 1-3.]
This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some are essential to help the site properly. Others give us insight into how the site is used and help us to optimize the user experience. See our privacy policy.