When I get to you I am more ...
[5427] When I get to you I am more ... - When I get to you I am more painful than you may think. But thankfully I can also make a tasty drink. What am I? - #brainteasers #riddles - Correct Answers: 7 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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When I get to you I am more ...

When I get to you I am more painful than you may think. But thankfully I can also make a tasty drink. What am I?
Correct answers: 7
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #riddles
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A California Highway Patrolman...

A California Highway Patrolman pulled a car over and told the driver that because he had been wearing his seat belt, he had just won $5,000 in the statewide safety competition.
"What are you going to do with the money?" asked the policeman.
"Well, I guess I'm going to get a driver's license," he answered.
"Oh, don't listen to him," yelled a woman in the passenger seat. "He's a smart aleck when he's drunk."
This woke up the guy in the back seat who took one look at the cop and moaned, "I knew we wouldn't get far in a stolen car."
At that moment, there was a knock from the trunk and a voice said, in Spanish, "Are we over the border yet?"
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Pierre de Fermat

Born 17 Aug 1601; died 12 Jan 1665 at age 63. French mathematician who has been called the founder of the modern theory of numbers. Together with Rene Descartes, Fermat was one of the two leading mathematicians of the first half of the 17th century. He anticipated differential calculus with his method of finding the greatest and least ordinates of curved lines. He proposed the famous Fermat's Last Theorem while studying the work of the ancient Greek mathematician Diophantus. He wrote in pencil in the margin, “I have discovered a truly remarkable proof which this margin is too small to contain,” that when the Pythagorean theorem is altered to read an + bn = cn, the new equation cannot be solved in integers for any value of n greater than 2.
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