Calculate the number 1783
[5727] Calculate the number 1783 - NUMBERMANIA: Calculate the number 1783 using numbers [7, 6, 8, 3, 26, 270] and basic arithmetic operations (+, -, *, /). Each of the numbers can be used only once. - #brainteasers #math #numbermania - Correct Answers: 14 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
BRAIN TEASERS
enter your answer and press button OK

Calculate the number 1783

NUMBERMANIA: Calculate the number 1783 using numbers [7, 6, 8, 3, 26, 270] and basic arithmetic operations (+, -, *, /). Each of the numbers can be used only once.
Correct answers: 14
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math #numbermania
Register with your Google Account and start collecting points.
Check your ranking on list.

Gallery Sale

An artist asked the gallery owner if there had been any interest in her paintings that were on display.
"Well, I have good news and bad news," the owner responded. "The good news is that a gentleman noticed your work and wondered if it would appreciate in value after your death. I told him it would and he bought all 10 of your paintings."
"That's wonderful," the artist exclaimed. "What's the bad news?"
"The gentleman was your doctor."

Jokes of the day - Daily updated jokes. New jokes every day.
Follow Brain Teasers on social networks

Brain Teasers

puzzles, riddles, mathematical problems, mastermind, cinemania...

Traffic signal

In 1909, Thomas M. Flaherty filed for a U.S. patent, with an idea for a "Signal for Crossings" This was the first U.S. application for a traffic signal design, later issued as No. 991,964 on 9 May 1911. His signal used a large horizontal arrow pivoted on a post, which turned to indicate the right of way direction. It could be activated by an electric solenoid by a policeman beside the road. Although filed first, it was not the first patent actually issued for a traffic signal. Ernest E. Sirrine filed a different design seven months after Flaherty, but his patent was issued earlier, and thus he held the first U.S. patent for a "Street Traffic System" (No. 976,939 on 29 Nov 1910).
This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some are essential to help the site properly. Others give us insight into how the site is used and help us to optimize the user experience. See our privacy policy.