Calculate the number 6157
[3622] Calculate the number 6157 - NUMBERMANIA: Calculate the number 6157 using numbers [9, 7, 3, 8, 63, 817] and basic arithmetic operations (+, -, *, /). Each of the numbers can be used only once. - #brainteasers #math #numbermania - Correct Answers: 24 - The first user who solved this task is Joe Smith
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Calculate the number 6157

NUMBERMANIA: Calculate the number 6157 using numbers [9, 7, 3, 8, 63, 817] and basic arithmetic operations (+, -, *, /). Each of the numbers can be used only once.
Correct answers: 24
The first user who solved this task is Joe Smith.
#brainteasers #math #numbermania
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Being the boss

A henpecked husband was advised by a psychiatrist to assert himself. "You don't have to let your wife bully you," he said. "Go home and show her you're the boss."

The husband decided to take the doctor's advice. He went home, slammed the door, saw his wife and growled, "From now on you're taking orders from me. I want my supper right now, and after you get it on the table, go upstairs and lay out my clothes. Tonight I am going out with the boys. You are going to stay at home where you belong. Another thing, you know who is going to tie my bow tie?"

"I certainly do," said his wife calmly, "the undertaker."

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Alfred Bernhard Nobel

Died 10 Dec 1896 at age 63 (born 21 Oct 1833). Swedish chemist and inventor who invented dynamite and other, more powerful explosives. An explosives expert like his father, in 1866 he invented a safe and manageable form of nitroglycerin he called dynamite, and later, smokeless gunpowder and (1875) gelignite. He helped to create an industrial empire manufacturing many of his other inventions. Nobel amassed a huge fortune, much of which he left in a fund to endow the annual prizes that bear his name. First awarded in 1901, these prizes were for achievements in the areas of physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. The sixth prize, for economics, was instituted in his honour in 1969.
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