CINEMANIA: Guess the movie title
[4561] CINEMANIA: Guess the movie title - See negative of movie scene and guess the title. Length of words in solution: 2,5,1,5 - #brainteasers #movie #film #cinemania - Correct Answers: 10 - The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle
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CINEMANIA: Guess the movie title

See negative of movie scene and guess the title. Length of words in solution: 2,5,1,5
Correct answers: 10
The first user who solved this task is Manguexa Wagle.
#brainteasers #movie #film #cinemania
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Trying to win a Nobel Prize

A man is driving down a country road, when he spots a farmer standing in the middle of a huge field of grass. He pulls the car over to the side of the road and notices that the farmer is just standing there, doing nothing, looking at nothing.

The man gets out of the car, walks all the way out to the farmer and asks him, "Ah excuse me mister, but what are you doing?"

The farmer replies, "I'm trying to win a Nobel Prize."

"How?" asks the man, puzzled.

"Well I heard they give the Nobel Prize to people who are out standing in their field."

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Martin Gardner

Died 22 May 2010 at age 95 (born 21 Oct 1914). American science writer who, for 25 years,wrote the highly popular “Mathematical Games” column for Scientific American. Though not an academic, nor having ever formally studied maths or science, he wrote widely and prolifically on both subjects, in such popular books as The Ambidextrous Universe and The Relativity Explosion. Since childhood, he was fascinated by magic, so one of his first books was Mathematics, Magic and Mystery (1956), about the maths of popular magic tricks. His interests grew wider and deeper. By age 42, he wrote his first column for Scientific American, and for many years thereafter popularized mathematics by highlighting puzzles that were elegantly understandable. He both inspired professionals and enchanted young readers to take an interest in mathematics.«
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