Decrypt hidden message
[2900] Decrypt hidden message - Can you decrypt hidden message (1C42 92S1 T5B38 OV1 IS B3LT5B38S 1C4ROVGC4)? - #brainteasers #wordpuzzles #riddles - Correct Answers: 5 - The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović
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Decrypt hidden message

Can you decrypt hidden message (1C42 92S1 T5B38 OV1 IS B3LT5B38S 1C4ROVGC4)?
Correct answers: 5
The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović.
#brainteasers #wordpuzzles #riddles
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Stopped By The Police

John and Jessica were on their way home from the bar one night and John got pulled over by the police. The officer told John that he was stopped because his tail light was burned out. John said, "I'm very sorry officer, I didn't realize it was out, I'll get it fixed right away."
Just then Jessica said, "I knew this would happen when I told you two days ago to get that light fixed."
So the officer asked for John's license and after looking at it said, "Sir your license has expired."
And again John apologized and mentioned that he didn't realize that it had expired and would take care of it first thing in the morning.
Jessica said, "I told you a week ago that the state sent you a letter telling you that your license had expired."
Well by this time, John is a bit upset with his wife contradicting him in front of the officer, and he said in a rather loud voice, "Jessica, shut your mouth!"
The officer then leaned over toward Jessica and asked. "Does your husband always talk to you like that?"
Jessica replied, "only when he's drunk."

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1,000th pulsar

In 1998, the discovery of the 1,000th pulsar in our galaxy was announced in a press release by the Jodrell Bank Observatory, University of Manchester, using the 64-meter Parkes Radio Telescope in New South Wales, Australia. A “multibeam”receiver was installed on the telescope in early 1997. This allowed the astronomers from England, Australia, United States, and Italy to find pulsars much faster than before. On average, they found a new pulsar in every hour of observing. By this date, the researchers had found more than 200 pulsars and they expected to find another 600 more before the survey ended. The “multibeam”receiver used consists of 13 hexagonally arranged receivers that allow simultaneous observations.
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