Find a famous person
[3541] Find a famous person - Find the first and the last name of a famous person. Text may go in all 8 directions. Length of words in solution: 8,6. - #brainteasers #wordpuzzles - Correct Answers: 23 - The first user who solved this task is Linda Tate Young
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Find a famous person

Find the first and the last name of a famous person. Text may go in all 8 directions. Length of words in solution: 8,6.
Correct answers: 23
The first user who solved this task is Linda Tate Young.
#brainteasers #wordpuzzles
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The Pickle

There was a guy on the beach with about 25 gorgeous chicks swarming all around him.
Seeing this, a second guy strolls on up to him and asks, "What's your secret?"
The guy whispers, "All you gotta do is stick a pickle in your pants."
In a fluorish, the second guy runs off and stuffs a pickle in his pants. But when he returns to the shore, he soon discovers that every single girl that looks his way, runs off screaming in bloody terror. Confused, he hurries over to the first guyand desperately asks, "Why are all the girls running away from me?"
The first guy looks up and replies, "The pickle's on the wrong side."

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Antiproton

In 1955, a new atomic subparticle called a negative proton (antiproton) was discovered at U.C. Berkeley. The hunt for antimatter began in earnest in 1932, with the discovery of the positron, a particle with the mass of an electron and a positive charge. However, creating an antiproton would be far more difficult since it needs nearly 2,000 times the energy. In 1955, the most powerful "atom smasher" in the world, the Bevatron built at Berkeley could provide the required energy. Detection was accomplished with a maze of magnets and electronic counters through which only antiprotons could pass. After several hours of bombarding copper with protons accelerated to 6.2 billion electron volts of energy, the scientists counted a total of 60 antiprotons.[Image: The first annihilation star, Faustina, of an antiproton found in film exposed by the Berkeley scientists, 1955]
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