Find the right combination
[4713] Find the right combination - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 16 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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Find the right combination

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 16
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #mastermind
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K9 Is For Assistance

Returning home from work, a blonde was shocked to find her house ransacked and burglarized. She telephoned the police at once and reported the crime. The police dispatcher broadcast the call and a K-9 unit patrolling nearby was the first to respond.
As the K-9 officer approached the house with his dog on a leash, the blonde ran out on the porch, shuddered at the sight of the cop and his dog, then sat down on the steps.
Putting her face in her hands, she moaned: "I come home to find all my possessions stolen. I call the police for help, and what do they do? They send me a BLIND policeman!"
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Optical pulsar identified

In 1969, an optical pulsar was identified for the first time by University of Arizona astronomers led by John Cocke and Michael Disney at the Steward Observatory. It was discovered in the Crab Nebula. Fourteen months before, the first type of pulsar to be discovered was in the radio spectrum and was detected on 28 Nov 1967 by Jocelyn Bell, a graduate student of Anthony Hewish. Most pulsars emit regular pulses of radio waves, some up to 1,000 pulses per second,. They are believed to be neutron stars with exceedingly rapid spin. Optical pulsarsflash at a similar rate, which is too fast for the eye to perceive. The Arizona astronomers used a stroboscopic technique to look at a known radio spectrum pulsar, at a time when an optical pulsar was only a theoretical question. Only a handful have been found since.«
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