Guess the Game Name
[6355] Guess the Game Name - Look carefully the picture and guess the game name. - #brainteasers #games - Correct Answers: 9 - The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T
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Guess the Game Name

Look carefully the picture and guess the game name.
Correct answers: 9
The first user who solved this task is Nasrin 24 T.
#brainteasers #games
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Bob, a 70-year-old, extremely

Bob, a 70-year-old, extremely wealthy widower, shows up at
the Country Club with a breathtakingly beautiful and very sexy
25-year-old blonde-haired woman who knocks everyone's socks off with her
youthful sex appeal and charm and who hangs over Bob's arm and listens
intently to his every word. His buddies at the club are all aghast. At
the very first chance, they corner him and ask, 'Bob, how'd you get the
trophy girlfriend?' Bob replies, 'Girlfriend? She's my wife!' They
are knocked over, but continue to ask. 'So, how'd you persuade her to
marry you?' 'I lied about my age', Bob replies. 'What, did you tell her
you were only 50?' Bob smiles and says, 'No, I told her I was 90.'
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Corfam

In 1964, E.I. duPont de Nemours Co. introduced Corfam. This hydrocarbon-based, synthetic substitute for leather was flexible, with tiny pores, for uses such as shoes, handbags, belts and suitcases. Shoes put on sale with Corfam uppers were supposed to give consumers the look, feel and durability of leather. DuPont predicted that by 1984, 25% of America's shoes would be made of Corfam. But synthetic leather was snubbed by customers in droves. It was one of the best-prepared products in terms of market and technology development and yet it failed. Time on the market: seven years. Production ceased in 1971. Corfam was described by Leonard Sloane in the New York Times as, "Du Pont's $100-Million Edsel," (11 Apr 1971).
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