I'm gentle enough to soothe ...
[3609] I'm gentle enough to soothe ... - I'm gentle enough to soothe your skin, light enough to fly in the sky and strong enough to crack rocks. What am I? - #brainteasers #riddles - Correct Answers: 29 - The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović
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I'm gentle enough to soothe ...

I'm gentle enough to soothe your skin, light enough to fly in the sky and strong enough to crack rocks. What am I?
Correct answers: 29
The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović.
#brainteasers #riddles
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A family took their frail, eld...

A family took their frail, elderly mother to a nursing home and left her,hoping she would be well cared for. The next morning, the nurses bathed her,fed her a tasty breakfast, and set her in a chair at a window overlooking a lovely flower garden.
She seemed okay, but after a while she slowly started to tilt sideways in her chair.Two attentive nurses immediately rushed up to catch her and straighten her up.
Again she seemed okay, but after a while she slowly started to tilt over to her other side.The nurses rushed back and once more brought her back upright. This went on all morning.Later, the family arrived to see how the old woman was adjusting to her new home.
"So Ma, how is it here? Are they treating you all right?"
"It's pretty nice," she replied. "Except they won't let me fart."
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Penicillin mass production patent

In 1948, Andrew J. Moyer was granted U.S. patent No. 2,442,141 for a “Method for Production of Penicillin.”He specified that his invention for the mass production of penicillin could be used by or for the U.S. Government for its purposes without royalty payments to him. A commercial plant using his process had been opened in 1944 in Brooklyn, New York, which produced enough doses of this antibiotic in time to save the lives of a great many of the war-wounded not only for the climax of as WW II, but also in the Korean War. His method comprised a large-scale fermentation, incubating penicillin-producing mold in an aqueous nutrient medium of corn-steeping liquor, glucose and sodium nitrate. This process is still in use today for the commercial fermentation production of penicillin and various other antibiotics.«
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