MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C
[5370] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (7, 9, 10, 12, 18, 21, 38, 39, 41, 50, 92) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 16 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A*B+C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (7, 9, 10, 12, 18, 21, 38, 39, 41, 50, 92) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A*B+C.
Correct answers: 16
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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Praying for a Parking Space

A laywoman was driving down the street in a sweat because she had an important meeting and couldn’t find a parking space. Looking up toward heaven, she said, “Lord, take pity on me. If you find me a parking place I’ll go to Mass every Sunday for the rest of my life and give up drinking wine.”
Miraculously, a parking space opened up right in front of her destination.
The woman looked up to heaven and said, “Never mind, Lord; I found one on my own.”
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Sir George Thomas Beilby

Born 17 Nov 1850; died 1 Aug 1924 at age 73.Scottish industrial chemist who developed (1890) the process of manufacturing potassium cyanide (widely used to extract gold from low-grade ore) by passing ammonia over a heated mixture of charcoal and potassium carbonate. Beilby entered the oil-shale industry in 1869 and greatly increased the yield of paraffin and ammonia by introducing the continuous retort. Noting the destruction of metals by ammonia at high temperatures, Beilby researched the flow of solids. He inferred that when a solid is caused to flow, as in polishing, the crystalline surface is broken down to a harder and denser layer. Although much criticized, this theory explained the hardening of metals under cold working and gave valuable stimulus to further research.
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