MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C
[5608] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, 25, 27, 28) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A-B+C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 18 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A-B+C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, 25, 27, 28) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A-B+C.
Correct answers: 18
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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Tour Bus Driver

A tour bus driver is driving with a bus full of old aged pensioners when he is tapped on his shoulder by a little old lady.

She offers him a handful of peanuts, which he gratefully munches up.
After about 15 minutes, she taps him on the shoulder again and she hands the driver another handful of peanuts.
When she is about to hand him another batch again, he asks her "Why don't you eat the peanuts?"
"We can't chew them because we have no teeth", she replied.
"We just love the chocolate around them."      

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Reginald C. Punnett

Born 20 Jun 1875; died 3 Jan 1967 at age 91. Reginald Crundall Punnett was an English geneticist who, with the English biologist William Bateson, were among the first English Mendelian geneticists. They reported the discovery of two new genetic principles: the first account of genetic linkage in sweet pea; and gene interaction (1905). Punnett devised the Punnett square to depict the number and variety of genetic combinations. Punnett had a role in connecting Mendelism with statistics. In 1908, Punnett was asked at a lecture to explain, “ if brown eyes were dominant, then why wasn't the whole country becoming brown-eyed?” Punnett in turn asked his friend the mathematician, G. H. Hardy. Out of this conversation came the Hardy-Weinberg Law which calculates how population affects genetic inheritance.
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