MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A+B*C
[7649] MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A+B*C - The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (2, 4, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 21, 22, 38, 62, 69) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A+B*C. - #brainteasers #math #magicsquare - Correct Answers: 1
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MAGIC SQUARE: Calculate A+B*C

The aim is to place the some numbers from the list (2, 4, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 21, 22, 38, 62, 69) into the empty squares and squares marked with A, B an C. Sum of each row and column should be equal. All the numbers of the magic square must be different. Find values for A, B, and C. Solution is A+B*C.
Correct answers: 1
#brainteasers #math #magicsquare
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Edward Anthony Spitzka

Born 17 Jun 1876; died 4 Sep 1922 at age 46. American anatomist and brain morphologist who assisted at the autopsy (29 Oct 1901) of the brain of Leon Franz Czolgosz, the assassin of U.S. president William McKinley. At the time, he had just published an exhaustive series of eight papers on the human brain, but was only in the fourth year of his medical training. Although he detected a few very minor variations in gyri and sulci patterns in the brain of Czolgosz, he reported in the New York Medical Journal (1902) that “nothing has been found in the brain of this assassin that would condone his crime.” He became editor of, and revised, American editions of Gray's Anatomy. Throughout his career he studied the brain morphology of groups of famous people, different races, and criminals, thought ultimately he was unable to link traits to brain structure.«
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