Replace asterisk symbols with ...
[3861] Replace asterisk symbols with ... - Replace asterisk symbols with a letters (**ST** *I*B******) and guess the name of musician. Length of words in solution: 6,10. - #brainteasers #music - Correct Answers: 14 - The first user who solved this task is Thinh Ddh
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Replace asterisk symbols with ...

Replace asterisk symbols with a letters (**ST** *I*B******) and guess the name of musician. Length of words in solution: 6,10.
Correct answers: 14
The first user who solved this task is Thinh Ddh.
#brainteasers #music
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Disappearing diner

A man and a beautiful woman were having dinner in a fine restaurant. Their waitress, taking another order at a table a few paces away suddenly noticed that the man was slowing sliding down his chair and under the table, but the woman acted unconcerned. The waitress watched as the man slid all the way down his chair and out of sight under the table. Still, the woman dining across from him appeared calm and unruffled, apparently unaware that her dining companion had disappeared.

After the waitress finished taking the order, she came over to the table and said to the woman, "Pardon me, ma'am, but I think your husband just slid under the table." The woman calmly looked up at her and replied firmly, "No he didn't. My husband just walked in the door."

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Johnnetta Cole

Born 19 Oct 1936.Anthropologist and educator who was the first African-American woman president of Spelman College, in Atlanta, the oldest, private, liberal arts college for black women in the U.S. (1988). While president of Spelman, she taught one course per term in addition to her other academic responsibilities. Her interest in anthropology was sparked in part because it was new and unfamiliar, and a most unusual professional aspiration for an African-American woman during the 1950s. In 1960-62, she worked together with her new husband in Liberia, where they worked together on research for their respective dissertations. He conducted economic surveys and she engaged in fieldwork in the villages and towns of that West African nation.
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