Take away my first letter, a...
[5023] Take away my first letter, a... - Take away my first letter, and I still sound the same. Take away my last letter, I still sound the same. Even take away my letter in the middle, I will still sound the same. I am a five letter word. What am I? - #brainteasers #riddles - Correct Answers: 25 - The first user who solved this task is Fazil Hashim
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Take away my first letter, a...

Take away my first letter, and I still sound the same. Take away my last letter, I still sound the same. Even take away my letter in the middle, I will still sound the same. I am a five letter word. What am I?
Correct answers: 25
The first user who solved this task is Fazil Hashim.
#brainteasers #riddles
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Getting Into Fights

They were married, but since the argument they had a few days earlier, they hadn't been talking to each other.
Instead, they were giving each other written notes.
One evening he gave her a paper where it said:
"Wake me up tomorrow morning at 6 am."
The next morning he woke up and saw that it was 9 o'clock.
Naturally he got very angry, but as he turned around he found a note on his pillow saying:
"Wake up, it's 6 o'clock!"
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Carborundum

In 1893, carborundum was patented by Edward G. Acheson of Monongahela, Penn. He had discovered it accidentally while trying to make artificial diamonds. He had dissolved carbon into molten corundum (a mixture of powdered coke and clay) in an electric furnace, and that yielded dark, hard, gritty crystals. He named the new material carborundum, and found it was one of the hardest industrial substances (second only to diamond), which made it an excellent abrasive material. In 1894, he started the Carborundum Company in Monongahela to produce grindstones, knife sharpeners, and various abrasives. Later, on 19 May 1896, obtained a patent for an electric furnace, suitable for making carborundum.«
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