What is the missing number?
[4956] What is the missing number? - MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace the question mark with a number? - #brainteasers #math #riddles - Correct Answers: 94 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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What is the missing number?

MATH PUZZLE: Can you replace the question mark with a number?
Correct answers: 94
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #math #riddles
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An elderly man and his wife, v...

An elderly man and his wife, vacationing at a cabin by the lake, were sitting on the porch and reminiscing about their younger years.
"This is the lake where I learned how to swim when I was a small boy," the husband said. "My father threw me into the water and I had to learn how to dog paddle to get back to the shore or drown. It was sink or swim."
"That was a cruel thing for your father to do," the wife said. "How could a loving father do such a thing to a small child? That must have been a very difficult way to learn how to swim."
"Not really," replied the husband. "Learning how to swim was the easy part. Getting out of that burlap bag first was the hard part!"
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Comet spectrum

In 1881, Sir William Huggins made the first photographicspectrumthe first photographic spectrum of a comet (1881 III) and discovered the cyanogen (CN) emission at violet wavelengths. (This fact caused near mass hysteria 29 years later as the Earth passed thru the tail of Halley's Comet and some persons worried about the effect of this for life on Earth.) The first spectroscopic observations of comets were made made by Giovanni Donati (1864) and by Huggins in 1868 when he visually compared the spectrum of comet Winnecke (1868 II) with flame spectra and found that the bands seen in the comet and in the flame, now known as the “carbon”or “Swan Bands”were similar. Spectroscopy soon became the standard technique for studying the light of comets.[Ref: W. Huggins, "Preliminary Note on the Photographic Spectrum of Comet b, 1881," Proceedings of the Royal Society 33 (1881): 1-3.]
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