Which is a winning combination of digits?
[4842] Which is a winning combination of digits? - The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot. - #brainteasers #mastermind - Correct Answers: 28 - The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic
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Which is a winning combination of digits?

The computer chose a secret code (sequence of 4 digits from 1 to 6). Your goal is to find that code. Black circles indicate the number of hits on the right spot. White circles indicate the number of hits on the wrong spot.
Correct answers: 28
The first user who solved this task is Djordje Timotijevic.
#brainteasers #mastermind
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Who pushed the forward button on my weekend

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Plutonium named

In 1942, a secret report was submitted suggesting the name “plutonium” for artificial element 94 since it followed neptunium and uranium (elements 93 and 92). The symbols Pu and Np were also suggestions. The paper was held secret until after WW II, when it was published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society in 1948. The authors were Glenn Seaborg and Arthur C. Wahl. Since Edwin McMillan and Philip Abelson had named neptunium (discovered 8 Jun 1940) after the planet that lies outside of the orbit of Uranus, the name for the next element in the periodic table was named after the next planet, Pluto. But instead of “plutium,” the authors decided on the name “plutonium.” Seaborg said, “It just sounded better.” They also liked “Pu” instead of “Pl.”Image: Twenty micrograms of pure plutonium hydroxide in capillary tube, Sep 1942.
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