Calculate the number 708
[119] Calculate the number 708 - NUMBERMANIA: Calculate the number 708 using numbers [9, 3, 2, 4, 15, 50] and basic arithmetic operations (+, -, *, /). Each of the numbers can be used only once. - #brainteasers #math #numbermania - Correct Answers: 42 - The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović
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Calculate the number 708

NUMBERMANIA: Calculate the number 708 using numbers [9, 3, 2, 4, 15, 50] and basic arithmetic operations (+, -, *, /). Each of the numbers can be used only once.
Correct answers: 42
The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović.
#brainteasers #math #numbermania
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Two Irishmen, Patrick & Michae...

Two Irishmen, Patrick & Michael, were adrift in a lifeboat following a dramatic escape from a burning freighter. While rummaging through the boat's provisions, Patrick stumbled across an old lamp. Secretly hoping that a genie would appear, he rubbed the lamp vigorously. To the amazement of Patrick, a genie came forth.r>r> This particular genie, however, stated that he could only deliver one wish, not the standard three. Without giving much thought to the matter, Patrick blurted out, "Make the entire ocean into Guinness!" The genie clapped his hands with a deafening crash, and immediately the entire sea turned into the finest brew ever sampled by mortals. Simultaneously, the genie vanished. r>r> Only the gentle lapping of Guinness on the hull broke the stillness as the two men considered their circumstances. Michael looked disgustedly at Patrick whose wish had been granted. After a long, tension-filled moment, he spoke: r>r> "Nice going Patrick! Now we're going to have to pee in the boat."
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Computer

In 1948, the first stored-program computer, the Small-Scale Experimental Machine, SSEM, ran its first program. Written by Professor Tom Kilburn, it took 52 minutes to run. The tiny experimental computer had no keyboard or printer, but it successfully tested a memory system developed at Manchester University in England. The system, based on a cathode-ray tube, could store programs. Previous electronic computers had to be rewired to execute each new problem. The Manchester computer proved theories set forth by John von Neumann in a report that proposed modifications to ENIAC, the electronic computer built at the University of Pennsylvania in the mid-1940s. The report also proposed the use of binary instead of digital numbers.
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