GUESS THE NUMBER: When you increase this four-digit number four times you got the same number in reverse order
[621] GUESS THE NUMBER: When you increase this four-digit number four times you got the same number in reverse order - GUESS THE NUMBER: When you increase this four-digit number four times you got the same number in reverse order - #brainteasers #math - Correct Answers: 68 - The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović
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GUESS THE NUMBER: When you increase this four-digit number four times you got the same number in reverse order

GUESS THE NUMBER: When you increase this four-digit number four times you got the same number in reverse order
Correct answers: 68
The first user who solved this task is Sanja Šabović.
#brainteasers #math
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Goat for Dinner

The young couple invited their aged pastor for Sunday dinner. While they were in the kitchen preparing the meal, the minister asked their son what they were having. "Goat," the little boy replied.

"Goat?" replied the startled man of the cloth, "Are you sure about that?"

"Yep," said the youngster. "I heard Pa say to Ma, 'Might as well have the old goat for dinner today as any other day.'"
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Karl Kelchner Darrow

Born 26 Nov 1891; died 7 Jun 1982 at age 90. American physicist who began his career as a research physicst with Western Electric (which became Bell Laboratories in 1925). He later became a science writer there, which continued until his retirement. His prolific writings also included critical reviews, obituaries of scientists, encyclopedia entries and four science books. At the Lowell Institute, he gave a notable series of lectures in 1935. As a speaker, he could interpret physics with clarity whether to a gathering of scientist or to wider intellectual audiences in other communities. Four universities at different times between 1929 and 1942 invited him as a visiting professor. He was the nephew of Clarence Darrow, known as the brilliant defense lawyer at the Scopes Monkey Trial.«
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